Glossary

  • Glossary: (or wordlist) a tool, vocabulary that is unique to a specific genre, art theory, criticism or art history. A way of familiarizing self with important ideas labeled by these words.

Annals, Alison, Abby Cunnane, and Sam Cunnane. “Working with Images and Ideas.” Saying What You See: How to Write and Talk about Art. North Shore, N.Z.: Pearson Education N.Z., 2009. 15-39. Print.

  • Context: who, what, where and why that surround every word, image, or artifact. How something is connected to the world both now, and in the past. A complex web of events. A changeable factor. May be highly personal contexts creates another enviroment of interpretation. Life experiecences of an individual cause them to view texts differently and react in unique ways, applied similarly to the creation of texts. Personal contexts are a crucially distinct way of seeing.

Ruszkiewicz, John J., Daniel Anderson, and Christy Friend. “Reading Texts.”Beyond Words: Cultural Texts for Reading and Writing. New York: Longman, 2009. 9-39. Print.

  • Surface Learning: When there is a lot of material to cover and too little time =, students are tempted to function on “auto pilot”, in superficial, unproductive ways”

Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Philippa Bright. “Critical Thinking.”Beginning University: Thinking, Researching and Writing for Success. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin, 1999. 45-61. Print.

  • Emotive language: Loader, a manipulative tactice rather than a precise description of some actuallity

Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Philippa Bright. “Critical Thinking.”Beginning University: Thinking, Researching and Writing for Success. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin, 1999. 45-61. Print.

  • Paradigm: A model of how things work or how they should be done or thought about. Examples: theories, illness, religious beliefs.

Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Philippa Bright. “Critical Thinking.”Beginning University: Thinking, Researching and Writing for Success. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin, 1999. 45-61. Print.

  • Truth: Comonsense, wisdom of elders, too obvious to question

Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Philippa Bright. “Critical Thinking.”Beginning University: Thinking, Researching and Writing for Success. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin, 1999. 45-61. Print.

  • Myth: Accepted that they may not be true

Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Philippa Bright. “Critical Thinking.”Beginning University: Thinking, Researching and Writing for Success. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin, 1999. 45-61. Print.

  • Reasoning: taking into account what you already know, the level in which you are educated on this matter is considerable also

Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Philippa Bright. “Critical Thinking.”Beginning University: Thinking, Researching and Writing for Success. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin, 1999. 45-61. Print.

 

Wednesday April 13th 2016

  • Narrow Casting: organizing information around content, limiting mass mediums to a choice for a specific audience : “wether by choice or not we see version of events that make no conscious effort to be comprehensive”.
  • Split screen: Two images on the same frame, an important concept of the capacity for human vision
  • Persistence of viewing: the human eye retains an image for an instance after it perceives it.

Mirzoeff, Nicholas. “The World on Screen.” How to See the World. London: Penguin, 2015. 131-61. Print.

Monday April 25 2016

  • Ideology: Often conceived as theoretical or artificial thinking about the way things actually exist. When something is portrayed using conceived, personal ideas that do not consider the conditions surrounding what it being portrayed, it may be based on the conceiver’s ideology. An ideology will effect the way we represent the everyday , thereby naturalizing the idealistic views which gives them value to an audience.

Butler, James. “What Is Ideology? – Terms of Engagement.” YouTube. Novara Media, 29 Nov. 2015. Web. 24 Apr. 2016.